EV Club Monthly Giveaway: 2017-09

Club Total:

1472.96

Description:

MR2ZEV Cash

Value:

0.00

real world EV's and the way forward.

Latest EV News and Hot Topics

Moderator: kchiang

real world EV's and the way forward.

Postby crite40 » Fri Feb 08, 2013 3:41 am

I'm new to this group, but I have built or restored 5 small EV's of various kinds.
My hope is that this group is dedicated to the practical use of electric traction in the
"REAL" world. Teslas are not for everyone after all!
So far I have built 1 child's 2 seater (many years ago).
A 24 volt electrically driven shopping trolley.
A 36 volt 850 watt single seater electric car (which I use almost daily for shopping and local trips)
a 24 volt 300 watt electric bike and most recently I've restored a 24 volt Ikon mobility scooter for my wife.

My experience so far is that the car is by far the best. The big problem with the bike is that the
planetary gearing in the motor has too low a ratio. This means that the motor is of no great assistance
just when you need it on steeper hills. The car final drive is through a 5 speed Derailleur gear. It's top speed
is about 40 KPH on the flat and it can climb steep hills at 12 KPH in bottom gear.
The big Ikon scooter is of course well known. But note this, the seat alone weighed 29.5 Kg!!!
This is more than one of the 12 volt 65 AH batteries it uses. The replacement seat weighs in at 1.3 Kg!

FYI my house is partially alternative energy. The house lighting and EV charging come from 300 watts of
solar panels on the roof. I have solar water heating, passive solar heating, a heat pump and collect rain water for
"grey water" uses.
Now cost of running my little car. Probably for 1200 Km per year are $270 NZ or about $230 US.
This presumes a new set of Pb gel batteries and 3 new 16" tyres per year.
In practice, so far the batteries have lasted for about 16 months per set and should now last longer as I have
improved the charger used with them. CO2 emissions =0
This would bring the costs down to about $160 PA.

Now, a suggestion in support of more practical vehicles like for example the Holden "Volt" hybrid.
This has enough battery capacity for ~75 Km without using the IC motor and therefore stores a lot of energy.
What the future could hold (quite practically) is a house with about 1 to 2 Kw of solar panels.
These charge a relatively low capacity battery system for lighting, TV, heat pump etc.
When this is fully charged they charge the cars much larger battery. When the car is at home the house inverter
has access to the cars battery power for heavier loads such as cooking, power tools, washing machines and other heavy
, but intermittent loads.
This removes (to a degree) one of the biggest problems with domestic solar electricity and at the same time makes
the means of transport part of an integrated alternative energy system. It also reduces the major running costs of Solar
power systems, the batteries.
crite40
Newbie
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2013 8:57 pm

Re: real world EV's and the way forward.

Postby ForrestGarcia » Mon Nov 18, 2013 11:55 pm

crite40 wrote:I'm new to this group, but I have built or restored 5 small EV's of various kinds.
My hope is that this group is dedicated to the practical use of electric traction in the
"REAL" world. Teslas are not for everyone after all!
So far I have built 1 child's 2 seater (many years ago).
A 24 volt electrically driven shopping trolley.
A 36 volt 850 watt single seater electric car (which I use almost daily for shopping and local trips)
a 24 volt 300 watt electric bike and most recently I've restored a 24 volt Ikon mobility scooter for my wife.

My experience so far is that the car is by far the best. The big problem with the bike is that the
planetary gearing in the motor has too low a ratio. This means that the motor is of no great assistance
just when you need it on steeper hills. The car final drive is through a 5 speed Derailleur gear. It's top speed
is about 40 KPH on the flat and it can climb steep hills at 12 KPH in bottom gear.
The big Ikon scooter is of course well known. But note this, the seat alone weighed 29.5 Kg!!!
This is more than one of the 12 volt 65 AH batteries it uses. The replacement seat weighs in at 1.3 Kg!

FYI my house is partially alternative energy. The house lighting and EV charging come from 300 watts of
solar panels on the roof. I have solar water heating, passive solar heating, a heat pump and collect rain water for
"grey water" uses.
Now cost of running my little car. Probably for 1200 Km per year are $270 NZ or about $230 US.
This presumes a new set of Pb gel batteries and 3 new 16" tyres per year.
In practice, so far the batteries have lasted for about 16 months per set and should now last longer as I have
improved the charger used with them. CO2 emissions =0
This would bring the costs down to about $160 PA.

Now, a suggestion in support of more practical vehicles like for example the Holden "Volt" hybrid.
This has enough battery capacity for ~75 Km without using the IC motor and therefore stores a lot of energy.
What the future could hold (quite practically) is a house with about 1 to 2 Kw of solar panels.
These charge a relatively low capacity battery system for lighting, TV, heat pump etc.
When this is fully charged they charge the cars much larger battery. When the car is at home the house inverter
has access to the cars battery power for heavier loads such as cooking, power tools, washing machines and other heavy
, but intermittent loads.
This removes (to a degree) one of the biggest problems with domestic solar electricity and at the same time makes
the means of transport part of an integrated alternative energy system. It also reduces the major running costs of Solar
power systems, the batteries.

You have done great job.. There is lot to learn from you and I would love to make similar modifications in my home and car.:):):)
ForrestGarcia
Newbie
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Nov 15, 2013 4:24 am


Return to News and Hot Topics

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron